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What is Your Data Worth on the Dark Web?

Call Today (888) 400-2748

What is Your Data Worth on the Dark Web?

You’re super careful about guarding your credit card number. But it might surprise you to learn that your Gmail password is 3 times more valuable on the Dark Web. 

Privacy Affairs recently published their Dark Web Price Index 2021, which gives us a fascinating look at how much of our personal data is for sale, and exactly how much people are paying. A quick browse through the list shows that a cloned Mastercard (with PIN!) sells for about $25, while a hacked Gmail account is worth $80. A $3000 transfer from your business’ stolen PayPal account can be purchased for $180.  Your business’ hacked Stripe account with payment gateway will fetch $1000. 

Protect your business’ data from becoming Dark Web fodder by using secure passwords with multi-factor authentication. Maximize your email security to avoid getting phished. And should worst come to worst, set up alerts with our Compromised Credential Monitoring so that you are notified the minute your information does appear on the Dark Web. AllSafe IT’s Safe Total is a multi-layered security solution that provides these safeguards and more.

Bones Ijeoma

Author since Aug 08, 2021
Bones Ijeoma is CEO and co-founder of AllSafe IT, and his mission is to make downtime obsolete. Bones received a BS in Computer Engineering from Cal State Long Beach and received an MBA in Entrepreneurship from USC Marshall School of Business. After finishing school and working for companies such as Marriott Hospitality, Dreamworks, and UCLA Medical Center, Bones realized there was a need for small businesses to have access to the same technology solutions that large corporations leverage.

Bones Ijeoma

Author since Aug 08, 2021
Bones Ijeoma is CEO and co-founder of AllSafe IT, and his mission is to make downtime obsolete. Bones received a BS in Computer Engineering from Cal State Long Beach and received an MBA in Entrepreneurship from USC Marshall School of Business. After finishing school and working for companies such as Marriott Hospitality, Dreamworks, and UCLA Medical Center, Bones realized there was a need for small businesses to have access to the same technology solutions that large corporations leverage.
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